Difficult Intubation In A Newborn

We’re ready to perform neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room. We may be less ready to have to deal with a difficult neonatal airway at the same time. Recently I, and my colleagues, had to manage an unanticipated difficult neonatal intubation in labor and delivery.

The Case

The baby was born extremely edematous, and in respiratory distress. Although it was easy to ventilate the baby using the NeoPuff, airway swelling prevented the neonatologist  from identifying the epiglottis and vocal cords. The anatomy was too distorted. Following protocol when faced with a difficult intubation, the neonatologist called a “Code White”, an overhead page that in my hospital summons help from anesthesia, nursing, respiratory care and pharmacy to assist with either a emergency pediatric cardiac arrest or emergency intubation.

As a responding anesthesiologist, I too was unable to see landmarks during laryngoscopy. Continue reading

Announcing My New Book: Pediatric Airway Management: A Step-by-Step Guide

At long last, after two years of writing (and rewriting),  illustrating, and  filming  on-line videos, I’m excited to announce the publication of my new book Pediatric Airway Management: A Step-by-Step Guide, by Christine E. Whitten MD.

Anyone who rarely cares for children tends to be anxious when faced with a small child’s airway. This is true even if they are comfortable with adult airway management.

My goal for this book is to demystify basic pediatric airway management. I want to give you the skills you need to recognize when a child is in trouble and act quickly to safeguard that child, including helping them breathe if necessary. Continue reading

NITROUS OXIDE: SHOULD WE USE IT?

When I was training, we used nitrous oxide on just about every anesthetic. It was easy to use. It was inexpensive. It didn’t tend to effect hemodynamics so it was useful in less stable patients when combined with an opioid. It helped speed induction through the second gas effect. It was not metabolized so renal and liver insufficiency were of less concern.

However, with all of the more recent investigation into reasons for cognitive dysfunction or decline in infants and the elderly following anesthesia, a lot more is now known about the pharmacologic disadvantages of nitrous oxide (1, 2, 3). Continue reading

Intubation During Cardiac Resuscitation

Intubating patients during cardiac resuscitation is often challenging because of the circumstances surrounding the intubation. Excitement and apprehension accompany this life saving effort. If you don’t intubate often, you’re likely to be nervous. Even experienced intubators get excited in emergency situations, but we control our excitement and let the adrenaline work for us, rather than against us.

Step one, therefore, is to remain in control of your own sense of alarm. The leaders, which includes the person in control of the airway, must stay calm. If you appear panicked, the rest of your team will follow your lead.

Step two is to quickly assess the situation. Is the patient being ventilated? Ventilation takes priority over intubation. Is there suction available? Without suction you many not be able to see the glottis, and you won’t be able to manage emesis. What help do you have? The intubator almost always needs some assistance in having someone hand equipment, or assist with cricoid pressure, among other tasks. As I tell my students, intubation is a team sport.

Finally you need to assess what position the patient is in, and how can you optimize that position. The patient is often in a less than optimal position while chest compressions are in progress. You usually find the patient in one of two awkward positions: on the ground or in a bed. This article discusses techniques to better manage intubation during cardiac resuscitation, especially with the patient in an awkward position. Illustrations are copyright from Anyone Can Intubate, 5th Edition.  Continue reading

When Learning Intubation Is Hard

Learning to intubate is easier for some people than for others. Sometimes, no matter how knowledgeable you are about the theory of the technique, the novice can still struggle to bring it all together to pass the endotracheal tube. The anatomy can be confusing. Understanding how to place the laryngoscope blade and manipulate that anatomy can be challenging. And all the while you must be ever vigilant to protect those precious front teeth, avoid hypertension and tachycardia, and breathe for the patient at regular intervals.

I believe there are 4 chief barriers that inhibit learning how to intubate:

  1. Failure to visualize how the outside anatomy links with the inside anatomy makes it hard to predict how deeply to insert the blade.
  2. A mistaken belief that placing the laryngoscope blade itself is all that is needed to align the axes of the airway and reveal the larynx.
  3. Failure to grasp the dynamic nature of the larynx, and the need to actively manipulate it during intubation.
  4. A lack of understanding that intubation is not a sequence of isolated steps, but is instead a complex dance of interacting steps, each setting the stage for the next.

This discussion is going to assume some knowledge of the basic technique of intubation. If you’d like to review those basics you can find links for multiple prior in depth discussions at the end of this article. (Illustrations and animation from Anyone Can Intubate, 5th edition, C Whitten MD.) Continue reading

Not All Airway Emergencies Need Intubation

An emergency department physician I met the other day shared with me an experience from her hospital  that offers a good example of the fact that there are many different ways of managing an airway emergency in a child that don’t involve intubation. Medical management can sometimes avoid some of the risks of losing the airway that intubation might impose.

The Case

The child was an 18 month old girl whose older brother had been playing with laundry detergent pods. He had offered a pod to his little sister, who promptly put it in her mouth and chewed it, releasing the liquid. Her mother had brought her to the emergency room with respiratory distress. The child had severe stridor and was breathing at 40 times a minute. Oxygen saturation was 92%. She was awake and alert but anxious.

The ED doctor recognized significant airway obstruction and was concerned that the obstruction could worsen if the edema got worse. She immediately called for an anesthesiologist and a Head and Neck surgeon to come to the Emergency Department to evaluate the child. While waiting, she gave 10 mg of IM decadron and treated the child with nebulized racemic epinephrine. She attached a pulse oximeter and left the child sitting on her mother’s lap and otherwise did not disturb the child, trying to avoid making her cry. By the time the anesthesiologist and surgeon arrived the stridor, although still present, sounded better.

The question was what to do now? Continue reading

Remember That Respiratory Failure Is Not Always Due to Lung Failure

There are many causes of respiratory failure. Some causes of respiratory failure result from disease or damage to the respiratory system. However disease or injury to other organ systems such as the central nervous system, the musculoskeletal system, or the presence of cardiac or septic shock can also cause respiratory dysfunction.

While final diagnosis will certainly affect treatment, assessing and managing the patient’s ability to breathe will not change with diagnosis.  However, once the airway is secure, you then have to diagnose and treat the real problem in order to resolve the respiratory failure.

 

The Case

In this case, I was an anesthesia resident doing my pediatric rotation at a children’s hospital. It was my turn to be on call for the weekend. At this particular hospital back in 1982, the anesthesia department managed the airway emergencies in the Emergency Department so when I got the page to go to the ED, I ran.

Inside the triage cubicle a 6 year-old girl was clearly unresponsive. She had been sick with fever, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for several days according to her mother, who was crying in the corner. She hadn’t been able to hold down any food or fluids for over 24 hours. Her temperature was 102F. She was breathing rapidly but very shallowly. We did not as yet have pulse oximetry, but her color was dusky blue. Her blood pressure was 60/40 and her pulse was 150. She looked septic.

I placed an oral airway and assisted her breathing. She didn’t react at all to the oral airway — no gag reflex. We decided to intubate.

My colleagues quickly placed an IV and I decided to intubate without induction agent or muscle relaxant. If she didn’t need those agents then I didn’t want to potentially compromise her status by giving them. Had she reacted at all when I started to perform direct laryngoscopy I would have aborted and changed the plan.

She didn’t respond at all as I slid the endotracheal tube into the trachea.

We gave her two boluses of 20ml/kg of normal saline. Her color improved, her pulse came down to 110 and her blood pressure rose to 80/50, appropriate for her age. But she still hadn’t woken up.

Ten minutes later the first blood test results returned. Her blood glucose was 10, extremely low. We gave her 2 ml/kg of D25W. Within two minutes she woke up and started fighting the endotracheal tube. As her other vital signs looked much improved and she was now awake and protecting her airway, we elected to extubate her.

The child was admitted to the pediatric ward, was treated for gastroenterits and she did well.

Learnings:

This was the first experience that I remember seeing in my career that demonstrated that hypovolemic shock and hypoglycemia can cause profound respiratory failure without lung pathology.  It’s important to remember that respiratory failure can result from a variety of other systemic problems, not just dysfunction of the respiratory system.

Table showing the difference multi-system causes of respiratory distress and failure

Respiratory distress or failure can come from many causes.

While assisting ventilation and protecting the airway are first priorities to stabilize a patient, treating the cause of the respiratory failure may require more than just ventilation and/or intubation. In fact, treating the cause can sometimes help you avoid the progression of respiratory distress to respiratory failure. If you don’t consider a potential problem or cause, you’re not going to be able to diagnosis it.

May The Force Be With You

Christine Whitten MD
Author of Anyone Can Intubate, 5th Edition